A Junk Car From Winter Driving

 Winter Left Me With A Junk Car And A Wrecked Truck

damaged car from winter storm

Winter driving and icy conditions left me with a junk car and a wrecked truck. Both are totaled vehicles. Having an extra used car is handy now. Severe weather is both frightening and dangerous for automobile travel. Motorists should know about safety rules for dealing with winter weather and roadside emergencies. While people are well aware of the general dangers of winter storms we still go out in it with our vehicles. The storm left me with a damaged car and a wrecked truck stay home if you don’t have to go out driving. Watch the snow storm from a safe, warm place. If you must leave. Thus, delay trips when severe weather is expected, let others know your route, destination and estimated time of arrival.

Wreaking Havoc On My Car

Winter weather is capable of wreaking some severe chaos, and the statistics on fatalities are staggering. Be cautious while driving in adverse weather you don’t want a junk car. Heavy snow and sleet can also reduce visibility. Lanes and roads are obstructed by snow accumulation, which reduces capacity and increases travel time delay. Snow and ice minimize pavement friction and vehicle maneuverability, causing slower speeds, reduced roadway capacity, and increased crash risk. When winter storms hit, it may be time to consider a vehicle better suited for snowy weather.

Each year, 24 percent of weather-related vehicle crashes occur on the snowy, slushy or icy pavement. Over 1,300 people are killed, and more than 116,800 people are injured in vehicle crashes on snowy, slushy or icy pavement annually. Nearly 70 percent of the U.S. population lives in these snowy regions. Average speeds decline by 30 to 40 percent on the snowy or slushy pavement. Freeway speeds are reduced by 3 to 13 percent in light snow and by 5 to 40 percent in heavy snow. The leading cause of death from winter storms isn’t exposure or exhaustion, but instead, automobile or transportation accidents. My wrecked car and wrecked truck are a part of the statistics this year. Thus, don’t be a statistic.

Driving My Old Junk Car In The Snow

The normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds needs to be increased to eight to ten seconds. Hence, this increased margin of safety will give the longer distance needed if you have to stop and that will prevent you from having a wrecked car. Accelerating, stopping, turning – nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement. Give yourself time to maneuver by driving slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Do not use cruise control when driving on any slippery surface. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry.

A Wrecked Car Is Expensive

Remember It takes longer to slow down on icy roads. Know your brakes before you have a junk car. The best way to stop is threshold breaking. Keep the heel of your foot on the floor and use the ball of your foot to apply pressure on the brake pedal. Don’t stop if you can avoid it. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it. Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads starts your wheels spinning. Try to get a little inertia going before you reach the ridge and let that inertia carry you to the top. As you enter the crest of the hill, reduce your speed and go ahead downhill as slowly as possible. Don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road.

Use Caution Before You Have A Junk Car

If you become snow-bound, stay with your vehicle. It provides temporary shelter and makes it easier for rescuers to find you. Don’t try to walk in a severe storm. It’s easy to lose sight of the vehicle. At night, keep the dome light on if possible. It only uses a small amount of electricity and will make it easier for rescuers to find you. Make sure the exhaust pipe isn’t clogged with snow, ice or mud. A blocked exhaust could cause deadly carbon monoxide gas to leak into the passenger compartment with the engine running. Use whatever is available to insulate your body from the cold. If possible run the engine and heater long enough to remove the chill and to conserve gasoline. The numbers are a bit scary but use some common sense this winter and be safe.

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